1. 2 Q-C women marry after 72 years together →

  2. I will say this, if you want to read books read The Hunger Games books. Those books are great. Book three is not great but all three books of Hunger Games are A BILLION TIMES better than the Twilight books.

    — Jason Mantzoukas (x)

  3. bluemantle:

    Recently my grandmother found out I’m queer. Her response was to tell me that she disapproves of me living with my “friend” (i.e. my girlfriend) and that I should give up my vile queer ways and become a Christian (Lol). She even sent me a bible.  Here are its remains, which I made into black-out poetry.

    Poem 1: Bisexual (from Leviticus 19:9)— “Have sexual relations with her.  Have sexual relations with him.  Have sexual relations with both a woman and a man.  Have sexual relations with yourself. Vomit on everyone who does not respect you.”

    Poem 2: Fisting (from Judges 8:5)— “water/ lap the water/ drink/go down to drink/your hands/go down/I give into your hands/go down/encouraged/down/on the seashore/the whole hand/your hand/inside/I get to the edge/and shout/grasping/crying out/Beth/Beth/Beth/Beth/Beth/God/I came”

    Poem 3: A Letter to the Exiles (from Jeremiah 28:13) — “Ze said: ‘Do not let lies name you, nor harm your heart. Gather. Raise the sword against them. They scorn and reproach, for they have not listened— again and again have not listened.’ “

    Poem 4: Child (from Ezekiel 16:22) — “Your father and your mother rubbed salt in. No one looked on you with pity or had compassion enough for you, for on the day you were born you were despised. Live! Grow.  I looked at you and saw you were enough.”

    Poem 5: Father (from Ezekiel 16:22) — “You never adored us. You became very angry. You took some out on us. Your sons and daughters were not enough? You slaughtered— in all your detestable practices— our youth.”

    Poem 6: Misandry (from Acts 27:41) — “Dangerous men should be broken.”

  4. From “Let America Be America Again” by Langston Hughes

    O, let America be America again—

    The land that never has been yet—

    And yet must be—the land where every man is free.

    The land that’s mine—the poor man’s, Indian’s, Negro’s, ME—

    Who made America,

    Whose sweat and blood, whose faith and pain,

    Whose hand at the foundry, whose plow in the rain,

    Must bring back our mighty dream again.

    (x)

  5. Ten Things White People Can Do About Ferguson Besides Tweet →

    7. Educate yourself about the systematic inequality that leads to civil unrest.

    The St. Louis American ran a powerful editorial today that fleshes out the history of Ferguson. When you finish reading that, go somewhere quiet for a bit and settle down with Ta-Nehisi Coates’s “The Case for Reparations.” Don’t stop there.

  6. America Is Not For Black People →

    There are reasons why white gun’s rights activists can walk into a Chipotle restaurant with assault rifles and be seen as gauche nuisances while unarmed black men are killed for reaching for their wallets or cell phones, or carrying children’s toys. 

  7. amandaonwriting:

A Map of the Introvert’s Heart

    amandaonwriting:

    A Map of the Introvert’s Heart

  8. I like venn diagrams; my record is pretty strong in that area. To that end, I want to draw your attention to John Venn’s 180th birthday and a kick ass interactive venn diagram via today’s Google Doodle.

    I like venn diagrams; my record is pretty strong in that area. To that end, I want to draw your attention to John Venn’s 180th birthday and a kick ass interactive venn diagram via today’s Google Doodle.

  9. Normally if somebody’s writing a pilot, I’m having to hope that straight white golf course male at the top of the chain will allow me to get it to my people [feminists, gay people, trans people]. But, oh, my people were watching it yesterday. It honestly feels slightly revolutionary.

    — 

    Jill Soloway, “Why ‘Transparent’ Creator Jill Soloway Feels the Amazon Pilot Process is ‘Revolutionary’” (x)

    And P.S. here’s the Transparent pilot if you haven’t yet seen it! So good.

  10. (Source: tinarannosaurus)

  11. 24 Hours of UberFacts: So Many Lies, So Little Time →

  12. sexfromscratch:

Hey New York people! I’m hosting a fun party with great writers and excellent music and tasty snacks and you’re invited. Come snag a copy of Sex from Scratch and listen to tunes from Julia Weldon. 

Woo hoo! Come join!

    sexfromscratch:

    Hey New York people! I’m hosting a fun party with great writers and excellent music and tasty snacks and you’re invited. Come snag a copy of Sex from Scratch and listen to tunes from Julia Weldon. 

    Woo hoo! Come join!

  13. justanoldfashiontumblog said: Just read your analysis (Nostalgia Does Not Make "Saved by the Bell" Grow Sweeter) for bitch magazine. Spot on! It serves as a reminder of how heteronormative the outline for many programs have been in spite of the profound realities that exist (which can encompass more meaning for a myriad of characters) in life. Keep doing great things!

    Wow! Thank you! For a flat show, there’s surprisingly a lot there…

  14. bitch-media:

When people write about Saved by the Bell today, they focus on the big cell phone, the eye-assaulting wardrobe, and a certain someone’s breakdown after a brief fling with caffeine pills. No matter how silly this show was, there’s no doubt of its popularity—to take this subject matter seriously is to take our consumption of culture seriously. This swirl of messages about gender and race in the show are confusing, but in my case, and perhaps for many others, I left the show behind in search of better characters with more relatable experiences. And yet no matter what I’ve found, I know that the show will always be around, airing weekday mornings as a nostalgic recitation of what a bunch of old male writers thought of young high school women.
From "Nostalgia Does Not Make Saved by the Bell Grow Sweeter" by Emily Hashimoto. 

This was so amazingly fun to write. And - absurd. That show is whack.
(But still, so fun.)

    bitch-media:

    When people write about Saved by the Bell today, they focus on the big cell phone, the eye-assaulting wardrobe, and a certain someone’s breakdown after a brief fling with caffeine pills. No matter how silly this show was, there’s no doubt of its popularity—to take this subject matter seriously is to take our consumption of culture seriously. This swirl of messages about gender and race in the show are confusing, but in my case, and perhaps for many others, I left the show behind in search of better characters with more relatable experiences. And yet no matter what I’ve found, I know that the show will always be around, airing weekday mornings as a nostalgic recitation of what a bunch of old male writers thought of young high school women.

    From "Nostalgia Does Not Make Saved by the Bell Grow Sweeter" by Emily Hashimoto. 

    This was so amazingly fun to write. And - absurd. That show is whack.

    (But still, so fun.)