1. 24 Hours of UberFacts: So Many Lies, So Little Time →

  2. sexfromscratch:

Hey New York people! I’m hosting a fun party with great writers and excellent music and tasty snacks and you’re invited. Come snag a copy of Sex from Scratch and listen to tunes from Julia Weldon. 

Woo hoo! Come join!

    sexfromscratch:

    Hey New York people! I’m hosting a fun party with great writers and excellent music and tasty snacks and you’re invited. Come snag a copy of Sex from Scratch and listen to tunes from Julia Weldon. 

    Woo hoo! Come join!

  3. justanoldfashiontumblog said: Just read your analysis (Nostalgia Does Not Make "Saved by the Bell" Grow Sweeter) for bitch magazine. Spot on! It serves as a reminder of how heteronormative the outline for many programs have been in spite of the profound realities that exist (which can encompass more meaning for a myriad of characters) in life. Keep doing great things!

    Wow! Thank you! For a flat show, there’s surprisingly a lot there…

  4. bitch-media:

When people write about Saved by the Bell today, they focus on the big cell phone, the eye-assaulting wardrobe, and a certain someone’s breakdown after a brief fling with caffeine pills. No matter how silly this show was, there’s no doubt of its popularity—to take this subject matter seriously is to take our consumption of culture seriously. This swirl of messages about gender and race in the show are confusing, but in my case, and perhaps for many others, I left the show behind in search of better characters with more relatable experiences. And yet no matter what I’ve found, I know that the show will always be around, airing weekday mornings as a nostalgic recitation of what a bunch of old male writers thought of young high school women.
From "Nostalgia Does Not Make Saved by the Bell Grow Sweeter" by Emily Hashimoto. 

This was so amazingly fun to write. And - absurd. That show is whack.
(But still, so fun.)

    bitch-media:

    When people write about Saved by the Bell today, they focus on the big cell phone, the eye-assaulting wardrobe, and a certain someone’s breakdown after a brief fling with caffeine pills. No matter how silly this show was, there’s no doubt of its popularity—to take this subject matter seriously is to take our consumption of culture seriously. This swirl of messages about gender and race in the show are confusing, but in my case, and perhaps for many others, I left the show behind in search of better characters with more relatable experiences. And yet no matter what I’ve found, I know that the show will always be around, airing weekday mornings as a nostalgic recitation of what a bunch of old male writers thought of young high school women.

    From "Nostalgia Does Not Make Saved by the Bell Grow Sweeter" by Emily Hashimoto. 

    This was so amazingly fun to write. And - absurd. That show is whack.

    (But still, so fun.)

  5. I guess there are lots of ways to get married. Some people marry someone they hardly know – which can work out, too. When you marry your best friend of many years, there should be another name for it. But the thing that surprised me about getting married was the way it altered time. And also the way it added a tenderness that was somehow completely new.

    — "Laurie Anderson’s Farewell to Lou Reed: A Rolling Stone Exclusive" (x)

  6. It’s got the consistency of an excitable child’s urine.

    — Sue Perkins, The Supersizers Go… ”Regency” (x)

  7. For parents, we need to realize, [our kids] have their own journey. Parents get it wrong when they don’t support their children. They have to go out and fight every day and face this world. The first battle should not be at home. I think that a lot of children in the LGBT community don’t succeed because the one thing they need the most is foundation. I just tell Jay all the time, baby you won the war. You’re gonna have a lot of battles but you won the war. Mama accepts and loves you for who you are. Your family does. My dad is a retired military naval officer and all he said was, “I’m gonna mess up sometimes and [use the feminine pronoun] ‘she’ but I’m gonna eventually get the ‘he’ thing. Just give grandpa some time. I’m gonna get it dude.” That was it.

    — Drea Kelly, VH1

  8. The biggest issue with equating the library with a Netflix for books is that it sends a false message that libraries are worth little more than $8 or $12 or $20 a month. That the services offered in libraries are little more than options to which people can subscribe, rather than actual services anyone can utilize at any time.

    When the library is made to be seen as a business, rather than the heart of a community or a fundamental service made possible through citizen-approved tax dollars, it makes the library expendable. That expendability then moves down the chain: staff salaries get cut, then staff withers, then more programs and projects that benefit the community — books and movies and CDs and magazines and newspapers and wifi and computer access and database subscriptions and programs for all shapes, colors, and sizes of people — disappear, too. It detracts from the unique aspects that make a library what it is: a place for all, rather than a place for some.

    Libraries reach out where Netflix reaches in.

    — from Libraries Are Not a “Netflix” for Books.  (via catagator)

  9. puppyclub:

    heathers-rivera:

    there is always hope 

    i live for this post

    as much as i love the sentiment, i kind of want to call bullshit on this. yes, your younger years might be pre-orthodontia, chubby cheeked, with glasses. but the people in the right column all look the same as each other. you know what’s cool? an adult who still expresses their individuality.

  10. I would not look to the U.S. Constitution, if I were drafting a Constitution in the year 2012. I might look at the Constitution of South Africa. That was a deliberate attempt to have a fundamental instrument of government that embraced basic human rights.

    We were just tremendously fortunate in the U.S. that the men that met in Philadelphia were very wise. … it’s true that they were lacking one thing, that is there were no women as part of the Constitutional Convention, but there were women around who sparked the idea.

    The genius of the Constitution, I think, is that it has this notion of who composes ‘We the people.’ It has expanded and expanded over the years so now it includes people who were left out in the beginning.

    — One woman I’m glad to have interpreting our Constitution, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (x)

  11. You think I think that an artist’s job is to speak the truth. An artist’s job is to captivate you for however long we’ve asked for your attention. If we stumble into truth, we got lucky, and I don’t get to decide what truth is.

    — Tabitha Fortis, “The U.S. Poet Laureate,” The West Wing

  12. BEYONCE VOTERS. A Tumblr worth knowing.

    BEYONCE VOTERS. A Tumblr worth knowing.

  13. (Source: joelmchalesarchive)

  14. I don’t hate [dresses]. I like them on other people. They just aren’t me. I don’t like to feel cold. Is that a good reason? Or just that I’m not the sort to show off flesh. I’m not against embracing my femininity, but I’ve never bought into the idea that you have to wear a dress to do that.

    —  Sue Perkins,  Daily Mail

  15. If you have some other profession that allows you your evenings or weekends, terrific, stick with that. Having a profession other than writing also has the potential side benefit of providing you with material, something to write about. I tell my students, if you’re interested in marine biology or llama farming, follow that string. Yes, it will probably take you a longer time to write that book, but it’s not a race. That’s another great thing about being a writer: you don’t age out.

    — The Rumpus Interview with Debra Dean (via therumpus)